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Maedi (Mēdi), ōrum, m., = Μαῖδοι,

  1. I. a Thracian people on the borders of Macedonia, Plin. 4, 1, 1, § 3; 4, 11, 18, § 40; Liv. 26, 25, 6; 28, 5; Eutr. 5, 7.
    Hence,
  2. II. Mae-dĭcus (Mēd-), a, um, adj., = Μαιδικός, of or belonging to the Mædi.
    Subst.:
    Maedĭca, ae, f. (sc. terra or regio), the Mædian territory, Liv. 26, 25, 8; 40, 21; 22.

meddix (medix), icis, m. [from the root med-, medeor; cf. Homeric μέδοντες], he who cares for, attends to, a curator, the title of a magistrate among the Oscans: meddix apud Oscos nomen magistratūs est. Ennius: summus ibi capitur meddix, occiditur alter, Paul. ex Fest. p. 123 Müll. (Enn. Ann. v. 296 Vahl.).
With the epithet tuticus (which prob. answers to the summus of Ennius, and is allied to totus), joined into one word, meddixtuticus or medixtuticus, Liv. 24, 19, 2; 26, 6, 13: is summus magistratus erat Campanis, id. 23, 35, 13.

Mēdēa, ae (arch.

  1. I. gen. Medeaï, Enn. ap. Cic. Tusc. 3, 26, 63; v. Enn. p. 127, v. 292 Vahl.; nom. Mēdē, acc. to id. p. 130, v. 311 Vahl.), and Mēdīa, f., = Μήδεια, a celebrated sorceress, daughter of Æetes, king of Colchis. She assisted her lover, Jason the Argonaut, in obtaining the golden fleece, accompanied him to Greece, and prevented her father, who was in pursuit, from overtaking them, by strewing the sea with her brother’s limbs. When Jason afterwards repudiated her, in order to marry Creusa, she killed the children she had had by him, and burned the bride to death in her palace: item ut Medea Peliam concoxit senem, Plaut. Ps. 3, 2, 52; Ov. M. 7, 9 sqq.; Hyg. Fab. 21, 22, 25: ne pueros coram populo Medea trucidet, Hor. A. P. 185.
    The subject of tragedies by several authors, v. Quint. 10, 1, 98.
    1. B. Transf.
      1. 1. Medea Palatina, i. e. Clodia, Cic. Cael. 8, 18.
      2. 2. Medea nigra, a precious stone, so named after Medea, Plin. 37, 10, 63, § 173.
        Hence,
  2. II. Mēdēis, ĭdis, f. adj., Medean, magical (poet.): Medeides herbae, Ov. A. A. 2, 101.

Mēdi, ōrum, m., = Μῆδοι, the Medes; poet. also for the Assyrians, Persians, Parthians, Mel. 1, 2, 5; Cic. Off. 2, 12, 41; Hor. C. 1, 2, 51; 2, 16, 6; Luc. 8, 386; Pers. 3, 53.
In sing.: Medusque et Indus, Hor. C. 4, 14, 42: pervigil, Val. Fl. 5, 604.
Hence,

  1. A. Mēdus, a, um, adj., Median, Assyrian, etc.: Hydaspes, Verg. G. 4, 211: acinaces, Hor. C. 1, 27, 5: sagittae, Prop. 3, 10 (4, 11), 11: flumen, i. e. doubtless the Euphrates, the most famous river of the remote East; though some understand it to mean the river Medus, a small branch of the Araxes, mentioned by Strabo, Hor. C. 2, 9, 21.
  2. B. Mēdĭa, ae, f., = Μηδία, a country lying between Armenia, Parthia, Hyrcania, and Assyria, the modern Azerbijan, Shirvan, Ghilan, and Mazanderan, Plin. 6, 26, 29, § 114; Verg. G. 2, 126.
  3. C. Mēdĭcus, a, um, adj., Median, Assyrian, Persian, etc.: vestis, Persian, Nep. Paus. 3: rura, Luc. 8, 368: arbor, the orange-tree, Plin. 12, 3, 7, § 15: mala, Assyrian, i. e. oranges, citrons, id. 15, 14, 14, § 47: smaragdi, id. 37, 5, 18, § 71: dea, i. e. Nemesis, a statue of Parian marble, Aus. Ep. 24, 54.
    Mē-dĭcus, i, m., a surname of the emperor Verus, on account of his victory over the Medes, Capitol. Verr. 7; v. Medica.

1. mĕdĭālis, e, adj. [medius], middle; subst.: mĕdĭāle, is, n., the middle (late Lat.), Sol. 20, 9 al.

2. mĕdĭālis, e, adj.: medialem appellabant hostiam atram, quam meridie immolabant, Paul. ex Fest. p. 124 Müll.; cf. meridies init.

Mĕdĭamna, ae, f. [medius-amnis], = Μεσοποταμία, Mesopotamia, Prisc. 1097 P.

mĕdĭans, antis, P. a., v. medio.

mĕdĭānus, a, um, adj. [medius], that is in the middle, middle (except Vitr., only post-class.): columnae, Vitr. 3, 2, 6: acroteria, id. 3, 5, 12: capita leonina, id. 3, 5, 15: digitus, Veg. Vet. 2, 40, 3: filius, Hier. Ep. 73, 3: porta, Inscr. Fabr. 463, 95.
Subst.: mĕdĭānum, i, n., the middle part, the middle: ex mediano coenaculi, Dig. 9, 3, 5, § 2.
Plur.: mediana malvarum, Apic. 4, 2, 133.

mĕdĭastīnus, i, m. [medius], a common servant, drudge, employed in all kinds of menial occupations (class.): tu illi mediastinus, Cato ap. Non. 143, 9: atque bubulcus, Lucil. ib. 7: exercitus collectus ex senibus desperatis, ex agresti luxuria, ex rusticis mediastinis, decoctoribus, Cic. Cat. 2, 3, 5 (dub.): tu mediastinus tacitā prece rura petebas, Hor. Ep. 1, 14, 14; Col. 2, 13, 7; 1, 9, 3: Prodicus instituens quam vocant iatralepticen, reunctoribus quoque medicorum, ac mediastinis vectigal invenit, i. e. medical assistants, Plin. 29, 1, 2, § 4; Dig. 4, 9, 1, § 5.

mĕdĭātĕnus, adv. [mediā tenus, like hactenus], as far as the middle, half way over, Mart. Cap. 6, § 683; 8, § 873 init.

mĕdĭātor, ōris, m. [medius], a mediator (post-class., esp. in eccl. Lat.): tot mediatorum praesentia, App. M. 9, 36, p. 202: mediator unius non est, Vulg. Gal. 3, 20; cf. v. 19; id. Heb. 8, 6: mediator advenit, id est Deus in carne, Lact. 4, 25; Tert. Carn. 15; id. Resurr. 51 al.; Aug. Conf. 10, 42, 2 sq.

mĕdĭātrix, icis, f. [mediator], a mediatrix (post-class.), Alcim. Avit. 5, 565.

mĕdĭbĭle, medicabile, Paul. ex Fest. p. 123, 21 Müll.

1. Mēdĭca, ae, f., = Μηδική [Media], an excellent kind of clover introduced from Media; Burgundy-clover, lucern (Medicago sativa), Verg. G. 1, 215; Plin. 18, 16, 43, § 144; Varr. R. R. 1, 42.

2. mĕdĭca, ae, a female physician; v 1. medicus, II. B.

mĕdĭcābĭlis, e, adj. [medicor].

  1. I. Pass., that can be healed or cured, curable (poet. and not ante-Aug.): nullis amor est medicabilis herbis, Ov. M. 1, 523; id. H. 5, 149: vulnus, Sil. 10, 416.
  2. II. Act., healing, curative, medicinal (post-Aug.): sucus, Col. 7, 10, 8: mel, Pall. Jan. 15, 19: carmen, soothing, Val. Fl. 4, 87.
    Hence, adv.: mĕ-dĭcābĭlĭter, medicinally (post-class.), Pall. Febr. 31, 2.

mĕdĭcābŭlum, i, n. [medicor], a healthy place (post-class.): aegris medicabula, App Flor. p. 353, 6.

mĕdĭcāmen, ĭnis, n. [medicor], a drug, medicament, in a good and a bad sense, meaning both a healing substance, remedy, medicine, and, as also medicamentum and the Gr. φάρμακον, a poisonous drug, poison (mostly poet. and in post-Aug. prose; only once in Cic.; cf., on the contrary, medicamentum).

  1. I. Lit., a remedy, antidote, medicine: violentis medicaminibus curari, * Cic. Pis. 6, 13: agrestia medicamina adhibent, Tac. A. 12, 51: facies medicaminibus interstincta, plasters, id. ib. 4, 57: medicamen habendum est, Juv. 14, 254: medicaminis datio vel impositio, Cod. Just. 6, 23, 28: potentia materni medicaminis, Pall. 3, 28: tantum (ejus) medicamina possunt quae steriles facit, Juv. 6, 595.
    1. B. Trop., a remedy, antidote (poet.): iratae medica mina fortia praebe, Ov. A. A. 2, 489 sq.. quasso medicamina Imperio circumspectare, Sil. 15, 7, 1.
  2. II. Transf.
    1. A. A poisonous drug, poison: infusum delectabili cibo boletorum venenum, nec vim medicaminis statim mtellectam, Tac. A. 12, 67: noxium, id. ib. 14, 51: impura, Flor. 2, 20, 7; Val. Fl. 8, 17.
    2. B. A coloring-matter, tincture, dye, Plin. 9, 38, 62, § 135: croceum, Luc. 3, 238.
      1. 2. In partic., a paint, wash, cosmetic: est mihi, quo dixi vestrae medicamina formae, Parvus, sed cura grande libellus opus, i. e. the treatise Medicamina faciei, Ov. A. A. 3, 205: facies medicamine attrita, Petr. 126.
    3. C. In gen., an artificial means of improving a thing: qui (caseus) exiguum medicaminis habet, i. e. rennet, Col. 7, 8: vitiosum, i. e. conditura, id. 12, 20: vina medicamine instaurare, Plin. 14, 20, 25, § 126: seminum, i. e. manure, id. 17, 14, 22, § 99.

mĕdĭcāmentārĭus, a, um, adj. [medicamentum], of or belonging to drugs or to poisons; only subst.

  1. I. mĕdĭcāmen-tārĭus, ii, m.
    1. A. A druggist, apothecary, Plin. 19, 6, 33, § 110.
    2. B. A preparer of poisons: homicida vel medicamentarius, Cod. Th. 3, 16, 1.
  2. II. mĕdĭcāmentā-rĭa, ae, f., a female mixer of poisons: moecha vel medicamentaria, Cod. Th. 3, 16, 1.
    1. B. The art of preparing drugs, pharmacy: medicamentaria a Chirone (reperta), Plin. 7, 56, 57, § 196.

mĕdĭcāmentōsus, a, um, adj. [medicamentum], that has a healing power, medicinal (perh. only ἅπαξ εἰρημ.; in Cato, R. R. 157, 2 dub.; al. medicamento): aqua, Vitr. 8, 3, 4.

mĕdĭcāmentum, i, n. [medicor], a drug, remedy, physic, medicine, medicament.

  1. I. Lit.: medicamentum alicui dare ad aquam intercutem, Cic. Off. 3, 24, 92: haurire, Plin. 24, 19, 113, § 174: sumere, to take, Curt. 3, 6, 3: componere, to compound, Plin. 32, 9, 34, § 106: somnificum, id. 37, 10, 57, § 158: medicamenta salubria, Liv. 8, 18: salutaria, Cic. N. D. 2, 53, 132.
    Also of remedies applied externally: medicamentis delibutus, Cic. Brut. 60, 217.
    1. B. Transf., like the Gr. φάρμακον, a drug, a potion.
      1. 1. A hurtful drug, poison: quaerit ibidem ab Hannibale, cur biberit medicamentum, Varr. ap. Non. 345, 23: coquere medicamenta, Liv. 8, 18: medicamentis partum abigere, Cic. Clu. 11, 32: medicamento sagittas tingere, Plin. 27, 11, 76, § 101: amatorium, a love-potion, philter, Suet. Calig. 50; of an enchanted potion, Plaut. Ps. 3, 2, 80.
      2. 2. A tincture for dyeing, a color, dye, mordant, Cic. Fragm. ap. Non. 521, 20: crassius, Sen. Q. N. 1, 3: rudia, Plin. 35, 6, 26, § 44.
      3. 3. A seasoning, condiment, Col. 12, 20.
      4. 4. A paint, wash, cosmetic, Sen. Ben. 7, 9, 2.
      5. 5. A plastering, Vop. Firm. 3.
  2. II. Trop.
    1. A. A remedy, relief, antidote (rare but class.): multorum medicamentum laborum, Cic. Clu. 71, 201: doloris medicamenta illa Epicurea, id. Fin. 2, 7, 22: panchrestum medicamentum (sc. pecunia), id. Verr. 2, 3, 65, § 152.
    2. B. (Acc. to I. B. 4.) An embellishment: medicamenta fucati candoris, et ruboris, Cic. Or. 23, 79.
    3. C. An enchantment: ne quid mali medicamenti inferretur, Plin. 28, 9, 37, § 142.

* mĕdĭcātĭo, ōnis, f. [medicor], lit., a healing, cure; hence, in agriculture, a besprinkling with vegetable juices, e. g., of lentils, to preserve them from the corn-worm, Col. 2, 10, 16.

mĕdĭcātor, ōris, m. [medicor], a physician (post-class.): annunciari Christum medicatorem, Tert. adv. Marc. 3, 17; Avien. Arat. 216.

1. mĕdĭcātus, a, um, Part. and P. a., v. medico.

2. mĕdĭcātus, ūs, m. [medicor], a charm (poet.), Ov. H. 12, 165.

mĕdĭcīna, ae, v. medicinus, II.

mĕdĭcīnālis, e, adj. [medicina], of or pertaining to medicine, medical, medicinal (not ante-Aug.): ars, Cels. praef.: cucurbitulae, cupping-glasses, Plin. 32, 10, 42, § 123: mortarium, id. 36, 22, 43, § 157: scalprum, Scrib. Compos. 53: digitus, the next to the little finger, Macr. S. 7, 13.

mĕdĭcīnus, a, um, adj. [1. medicus], of or belonging to a physician or surgeon, medical (as adj. only ante- and post-class.; as subst. class.).

  1. I. Adj.: ars, the healing art, medicine, Varr. L. L. 5, § 93 Müll.; Hyg. Fab. 274; Aug. Conf. 4, 3.
  2. II. Subst.: mĕdĭcīna, ae, f.
    1. A. (Sc. ars.) The healing or medical art, medicine, surgery: ut medicina (ars est) valetudinis, Cic. Fin. 5, 6, 16; id. Off. 1, 42, 151: medicina, quae ex observatione salubrium atque his contrariorum reperta est, Quint. 2, 17, 9: tertiam esse partem medicinae, quae manu curet, i. e. surgery, Cels. prooem. 7: medicinam excolere, id. ib.: exercere, Cic. Clu. 63, 178: facere, Phaedr. 1, 14, 2: factitare, to practise, Quint. 7, 2, 26: clarus medicinā, Plin. 25, 2, 5, § 15.
    2. B. (Sc. officina.) The shop of a physician or surgeon; the booth in which a physician waited on his patients and vended his medicines (rare; not in Cic.): in medicinis, in tonstrinis, Plaut. Am. 4, 1, 6; cf.: veteres absolute dicebant pistrinam et sutrinam et medicinam, Don. Ter. Ad. 4, 2, 45 (the taberna of the physician is mentioned in Plin. 29, 1, 6, § 12).
    3. C. (Sc. res.) A remedy, medicine.
      1. 1. Lit.: si medicus veniat, qui huic morbo facere medicinam potest, i. e. heal, cure, Plaut. Cist. 1, 1, 76: accipere medicinam, Cic. Att. 12, 21, 5.
        1. b. Transf.
          1. * (α) Like medicamentum, poison, Att. ap. Non. 20, 31 (Trag. Rel. v. 579 Rib.).
          2. (β) The pruning of vines, Plin. 17, 22, 35, § 191.
      2. 2. Trop., a remedy, relief, antidote (a favorite word of Cic.): singulis medicinam consilii atque orationis meae afferam, Cic. Cat. 2, 8, 17: sed non egeo medicinā: me ipse consolor, id. Lael. 3, 10: sublevatio et medicina, id. Rep. 2, 34, 59: temporis, id. Fam. 5, 16, 6: doloris, id. Ac. 1, 3: laboris, id. Fin. 5, 19, 54: calamitatis, id. Tusc. 3, 22, 54: quae sanaret vitiosas partes rei publicae, id. Att. 2, 1, 7: crede mihi, non ulla tua’st medicina figurae, i. e. no means of rendering beautiful, Prop. 1, 2, 7: periculorum, Cic. Sest. 23, 51: malorum, Ov. Tr. 5, 1, 33: curae, id. P. 1, 2, 43.
        In plur.: his quatuor causis totidem medicinae opponuntur, Cic. de Or. 2, 83, 339.

mĕdĭco, āvi, ātum, 1, v. a. [1. medicus], to heal, cure (poet. and in post-Aug. prose for the class. medeor).

  1. I. Lit.
          1. (α) With acc.: ego istum lepide medicabo metum, Plaut. Most. 2, 1, 40: (apes) odore galbani, Col. 9, 13, 7: vulneris aestus, Sil. 6, 98: furores, Nemes. Ecl. 2, 28.
          2. (β) With dat.: tremulis membris, Ser. Samm. 48, 902.
  2. II. Transf.
    1. A. To impart the virtue of a remedy, give healing power to: hoc fusum labris splendentibus amnem Inficit, occulte medicans, Verg. A. 12, 418.
    2. B. To besprinkle with the juice of herbs, to medicate: semina, to steep, Verg. G. 1, 193: semina omnia suco herbae quae sedum appellatur, medicare, Col. 11, 30, 40: exigua portione medicatur aqua, id. 6, 4, 4; 9, 13, 3: vinum medicatum, i. e. spurious, adulterated, id. 1, 6, 20: merum, Front. 2, 5, 12: ficus, Plin. 16, 27, 51, § 118.
    3. C. To color, dye, with tingere: capillos, Ov. Am. 1, 14, 6.
      Hence, mĕdĭcātus, a, um, P. a.
      1. 1. Besprinkled with juices, sprinkled, medicated (poet. and post-Aug.): semina suco herbae sedi, Col. 1, 3: sedes, places sprinkled with the juice of herbs, Verg. G. 4, 65: somnus, produced by a juice or a charm, Ov. H. 12, 107: fruges, Verg. A. 6, 420: lana medicata fuco, stained, dyed, Hor. C. 3, 5, 28: Amyclaeis medicatum vellus ahenis, Ov. R. Am. 707.
        To poison: boletum medicatum, i. e. poisoned, Suet. Claud. 44: herbae, Col. 11, 3, 64; cf.: medicata veneno tela, Sil. 7, 453: medicatae cuspidis ictus, id. 13, 197: mortui, embalmed, Mel. 1, 57.
      2. 2. Useful or good for healing, medicinal: aquae medicatae, Sen. Q. N. 3, 25, 9: sapor aquae, Plin. Ep. 8, 20, 4: fontes, Cels. 4, 5; Sen. Prov. 2, 1; Plin. 2, 93, 95, § 207: potio, Curt. 3, 6, 2: inguen, Juv. 12, 36.
        Comp.: lac bubulum medicatius, Plin. 28, 9, 33, § 124.
        Sup.: res medicatissimae, Plin. 28, 7, 23, § 78.

mĕdĭcor, ātus, 1, v. dep. a. [id.], to heal, cure.

  1. I. Lit. (poet. and in post-Aug. prose).
          1. (α) With dat.: senibus medicantur anhelis, Verg. G. 2, 135.
          2. (β) With acc.: cuspidis ictum, Verg. A. 7, 756.
  2. II. Trop., to cure, relieve (ante-class.): cum ego possim in hac re medicari mihi, Ter. And. 5, 4, 41: alicui, id. ib. 5, 1, 12: ego istum lepide medicabor metum, Plaut. Most. 2, 1, 40 Weise (Lorenz, medicabo).

mĕdĭcōsus, a, um, adj. [1. medicus], healing (post-class.): fomentationes, Cael. Aur. Tard. 2, 1.

1. mĕdĭcus, a, um [medeor], of or pertaining to healing, healing, curative, medical (as adj., poet. and in post-Aug. prose).

  1. I. Adj.: medicas adhibere manus ad vulnera, Verg. G. 3, 455: ars, Ov. Tr. 5, 6, 12: potus, Nemes. Cyn. 222: vis, Plin. 36, 27, 69, § 202: salubritas, id. 5, 16, 15, § 72: usus, id. 22, 25, 81, § 163: digitus, the next to the little finger (cf. medicinalis), id. 30, 12, 34, § 108.
    1. * B. Transf., magical: Marmaridae, medicum vulgus, ad quorum tactum mites jacuere cerastae, Sil. 3, 300.
  2. II. Subst.:
    1. A. mĕdĭcus, i, m.
      1. 1. A medical man, physician, surgeon (class.): medicus nobilissimus atque optimus quaeritur, Cic. Clu. 21, 57: medicum arcessere, Plaut. Men. 5, 2, 122: admovere aegro, Suet. Ner. 37: vulnerum, a surgeon, Plin. 29, 1, 8, § 22: caeduntur tumidae medico ridente mariscae, Juv. 2, 13; cf.: medicus ait se obligasse crus fractum Aesculapio, Apollini autem bracchium, Plaut. Men. 5, 3, 9: MEDICVS CLINICVS, CHIRVRGVS, OCVLARIVS, Inscr. Orell. 2983: AVRICVLARIVS, ib. 4227: IVMENTARIVS, ib. 4229; cf.: medici pecorum, Varr. R. R. 2, 7 fin.: LEGIONIS, Inscr. Orell. 448; 4996: DVPLARIVS TRIREMIS, ib. 3640: instrumentum medici, Paul. Sent. 3, 6, 62.
        Prov.: medice, cura teipsum, Vulg. Luc. 4, 23.
      2. 2. The finger next the little finger, Gr. δάκτυλος ἰατρικός, Auct. Her. 3, 20, 33.
    2. B. mĕdĭ-ca, ae, f., a female physician (post-class.), App. M. 5, p. 363 Oud.; Inscr. Orell. 4230 sq.; Inscr. Grut. 635, 9; 636, 1 sq.
      Also, a midwife, Interpr. Paul. Sent. 2, 24, 8; Ambros. Ep. 5.
    3. C. mĕdĭca, ōrum, n., medicinal herbs, Plin. 19, 5, 27, § 89.

2. Mēdĭcus, a, um, v. Medi, II. B.

mĕdīdies, v. meridies.

mĕdĭē, adv., v. medius fin.

mĕdĭĕtas, ātis, f. [medius], the middle, place in the middle, midst (in Cic. only as transl. of the Gr. μεσότης; elsewhere postclass.).

  1. I. Lit.: vix audeo dicere medietates, quas Graeci μεσότητας appellant, Cic. Univ. 7, 20: narium, Lact. 10, 19: totius loci, App. M. 2, p. 116, 6: sic feliciore loco medietatis est positus (sc. homo), App. Asclep. 6, p. 79: in mediatate distinctis aquis, Tert. de Bapt. 3.
    1. B. Transf., a half, moiety (syn. dimidium): decoquere aliquid usque ad medietatem, Pall. Mart. 10, 10 and 30: sulcum usque ad medietatem replere, id. Mai. 3: debiti, Cod. Th. 4, 19, 1.
  2. II. Trop., a middle course, medium: medietatem quandam sequi, Dig. 5, 4, 3 fin.; Arn. 2, 65: ejusmodi medietates inter virtutes et vitia intercedere, App. Dogm. Plat. p. 14, 3.

mĕdĭlūnĭus, a, um, adj. [mediusluna], in the middle of the month, having half a disk, half-orbed (post-class): (luna) primo est corniculata, deinde medilunia, Mart. Cap. 7, § 738.

mĕdimnum, i, n., and mĕdim-nus, i, m., = μέδιμνος, a Greek measure of corn, a Greek bushel (containing six modii): primus, secundus, tertius medimnus, Lucil. ap. Non. 213, 21; so in masc. form, Nep. Att. 2 fin.: medimnum tritici seritur, Cic. Verr. 2, 3, 47, § 112: ut quot jugera sunt sata, totidem medimna decumae debeantur, id. ib. 2, 3, 47, § 113; in gen. plur.: medimnūm, id. ib.; so id. ib. 2, 3, 37, § 84; 2, 3, 39, § 90; Varr. ap. Non. 495, 32 (cf. Neue, Formenl. 1, p. 107).

mĕdĭo, 1, v. a. [medius], to halve, divide in the middle (post-class.), Apic. 3, 9.

  1. B. Neutr., to be in the middle: melius Juno mediante, Pall. Mart. 10, 32.

* mĕdĭō̆crĭcŭlus, a, um, adj. dim. [mediocris], rather middling: exercitus, Cato ap. Fest. p. 154, and Paul. ex Fest. p. 155 Müll.

mĕdĭō̆cris, e (ō usually; rarely ŏ), adj. [medius], in a middle state between too much and too little, middling, moderate, tolerable, ordinary; sometimes also, not remarkable, indifferent, mediocre.

  1. I. In gen. (class.).
    1. A. Lit., of size, quantity, degree, etc., in material things: castellum, Sall. J. 92, 5: spatium, Caes. B. G. 5, 43: agmen, Hirt. B. G. 8, 9: intervallum, id. B. Alex. 30.
    2. B. Of mind, character, ability, acts, achievements, etc.: C. L. Memmii fuerunt oratores mediocres, Cic. Brut. 36, 136: L. Cotta in mediocrium oratorum numero, id. ib. 36, 137: non mediocres viri, sed maximi et docti, id. Rep. 3, 11, 19: homines, id. de Or. 1, 21, 94: vir, Just. 1, 4, 4: poëta, Hor. A. P. 372: in mediocribus vel studiis vel officiis, Cic. Rep. 1, 3, 4: amicitia, id. Lael. 6, 10: malum, id. Tusc. 3, 10, 22: artes, id. de Or. 1, 2, 6: eloquentia, id. ib. 1, 29, 133: ingenium, id. ib. 2, 27, 119: excusaremediocris est animi, narrow, small, Caes. B. C. 3, 20: ut mediocris jacturae te mergat onus, Juv. 13, 7.
  2. II. Esp.
    1. A. Per litoten, with non (haud, nec), not insignificant, not common or trivial: Jugurthae non mediocrem animum pollicitando accendebant, i. e. ardent, ambitious, Sall. J. 8, 1: non mediocris hominis haec sunt officia, Ter. Ad. 5, 9, 9: haud mediocris hic, ut ego quidem intellego, vir fuit, Cic. Rep. 2, 31, 55: nec mediocre telum ad res gerendas, id. Lael. 17, 61: non mediocrem sibi diligentiam adhibendam intellegebat, uncommon, extraordinary, Caes. B. G. 3, 20: praemium non mediocre, Suet. Vesp. 18: non mediocris dissensio, Quint. 9, 1, 10 et saep.
    2. * B. With syllaba, common = anceps: syllabarum longarum et brevium et mediocrium junctura, Gell. 16, 18, 5.
      Hence, adv.: mĕdĭō̆crĭ-ter.
      1. 1. Moderately, tolerably, ordinarily, not particularly, not very, not remarkably, not much (class.): ordo annalium mediocriter nos retinet, Cic. Fam. 5, 12, 5: corpus mediocriter aegrum, id. Tusc. 3, 10, 22.
          1. (β) By litotes, with haud, ne, non (cf.: supra, mediocris, II. A.): flagitium, et damnum haud mediocriter, Plaut. Merc. 2, 1, 13: non mediocriter, in no moderate degree, Caes. B. G. 1, 39: reprehensus est non mediocriter, i. e. greatly, exceedingly, very much, Quint. 11, 1, 17; so id. 8, 2, 2; 9; 11, 1, 57 al.
          2. (γ) Very little: ne mediocriter quidem disertus, not in the least, Cic. de Or. 1, 20, 91.
      2. 2. With moderation, calmly, tranquilly = modice (rare, and perh. only in Cic.): quod mihi non mediocriter ferendum videtur, Cic. Verr. 2, 3, 41, § 95.
        Comp.: hoc vellem mediocrius, Cic. Att. 1, 20, 5.

mĕdĭō̆crĭtas, ātis, f. [mediocris].

  1. I. A middle state, a medium, mean; moderateness, moderation (class.): mediocritatem illam tenere, quae est inter nimium et parum, Cic. Off. 1, 25, 89; 1, 39, 140: in dicendo, mediocrity, id. de Or. 1, 25, 117: dicendi, id. Brut. 66, 235: vultus, i. e. a medium between excessive gayety and over-seriousness, Auct. Her. 3, 15, 26: auream quisquis mediocritatem Diligit, Hor. C. 2, 10, 5.
    Of style: cum omnis virtus sit mediocritas, Cic. Brut. 40, 149: mediocritatis (exemplum esse) Terentium, Varr. ap. Gell. 6, 14, 6.
    In plur.: mediocritates illi probabant, moderate passions, Cic. Ac. 2, 44, 135: mediocritates vel perturbationum vel morborum animi, id. Tusc. 3, 10, 22.
  2. II. Meanness, insignificance, littleness, inferiority (rare but class.): hominum, Vell. 2, 130, 3: quod meae mediocritati conveniret, my insignificance, Gell. 14, 2, 25; cf.: mediocritas nostra, my modest self, Vell. 2, 111, 3: ingenii, Cic. Phil. 2, 1, 2: memoriae, Quint. 11, 2, 39.

mĕdĭō̆crĭter, adv., v. mediocris fin.

Mĕdĭōlānum or Mĕdĭōlānĭum, i, n.

  1. I. A city in Gallia Cisalpina, the capital of the Insubres, the mod. Milan. Form Mediolanum, Plin. 3, 17, 21, § 124; Just. 29, 5, 8; Tac. H. 1, 70; Aus. de Clar. Urb. 4, 1. Form Mediolanium, Liv. 5, 34, 9; 34, 46, 1; Suet. Aug. 20.
    Hence,
    1. B. Mĕdĭōlā-nensis, e, adj., of or belonging to Milan, Milanese: (ager), Varr. R. R. 1, 8: praeco, Cic. Pis. 26, 62.
      In plur.: Mĕdĭōlānen-ses, ĭum, m., the Milanese, Varr. R. R. 1, 8, 2.
  2. II. The chief city of the Santoni in Gaul, on the river Carantonus, now Saintes, Amm. 15, 11, 12; Itin. Anton. p. 459, 3.

Mĕdĭōmātrĭci, ōrum, m., a people of Gaul, on the Moselle, in the neighborhood of Metz, Caes. B. G. 4, 10.
Hence, Mĕdĭ-ōmātrĭcus, a, um, adj.
In sing., Inscr. Grut. 731, 12; and in fem., Inscr. Orell. 3523.

1. mēdĭon, ii, n., = μήδιον, a medicinal plant, Plin. 27, 12, 79, § 104.

2. Mĕdĭon, ōnis, f., a city of Acarnania, Liv. 36, 11, 10; 36, 12, 1; 44, 23, 3.
Hence, Mĕdĭōnĭus, a, um, adj., of or belonging to Medion.
Plur. subst.:
Mĕ-dĭōnii, ōrum, m., the inhabitants of Medion, Liv. 36, 12, 3.

mĕdĭoxĭmē (mĕdĭoxŭmē), adv., v. medioximus fin.

mĕdĭoxĭmus (mĕdĭoxŭmus), a, um, adj. [superlative of an obsolete mediox for medius].

  1. I. In the middle, middlemost: medio actum modo, Non. 141, 4: medioximus, μέσος, Gloss. Philox. (anteand post-class.): medioxumam quam duxit uxorem, Plaut. Cist. 2, 3, 67: ita me di deaeque superi atque inferi et medioxumi, i. e. holding a middle place between the supernal and infernal deities, id. ib. 2, 1, 35: tertium habent (deorum genus), quos medioximos Romani veteres appellant, quod et sui ratione et loco et potestate diis summis sunt minores, hominum natura profecto majores, between gods and men, App. Dogm. Plat. 1, p. 8: quidam aras superiorum deorum volunt esse, medioxumorum, id est marinorum, focos, inferorum mundos, i. e. the sea-gods, between those of heaven and those of Hades, Serv. Verg. A. 3, 134.
    Of tutelar deities: hos omnes Graeci δαίμονας dicunt, ἀπὸ τοῦ δαήμονας εἶναι: Latini medioximos vocitarunt, Mart. Cap. 2, § 154.
  2. II. Middling, moderate: medioximum mediocre, Paul. ex Fest. p. 123 Müll.
    Hence, *adv.: mĕdĭ-oxĭmē (mĕdĭoxŭmē), moderately, tolerably, Varr. ap. Non. 141, 7.

medipontus, i, m., a kind of thick rope (ante-class.): medipontos privos loreos (al. melipontos), Cato, R. R. 3, 5; 12.

mĕdĭtābundus, a, um, adj. [meditor], earnestly meditating, designing; with acc. (post-class.): Romanum meditabundus bellum, Just. 38, 3, 7.

mĕdĭtāmen, ĭnis, n. [meditor], a thinking of any thing, a preparation (poet.): meditamina belli, Sil. 8, 326: rerum, Prud. Psych. 234.

mĕdĭtāmentum, i, n. [meditor], a thinking of any thing, a preparation.

  1. I. In gen.: belli, Tac. H. 4, 26; id. A. 15, 35: arietum meditamenta, thoughtfully prepared battering-rams, Amm. 23, 4, 10.
  2. * II. In partic.; plur.: puerilia, rudiments taught to children at school, Gell. 8, 10 in lemm.

mĕdĭtātē, adv., v. meditor fin.

mĕdĭtātĭo, ōnis, f. [meditor], a thinking over any thing, contemplation, meditation (class.).

  1. I. Lit. (very rare): stultam esse meditationem futuri mali, aut fortasse ne futuri quidem, Cic. Tusc. 3, 15, 32.
  2. II. Transf.
    1. A. Preparation for any thing (so most freq.): multa commentatio atque meditatio, Cic. de Or. 2, 27, 118; obeundi sui muneris, id. Phil. 9, 1, 2: meditatio atque exercitatio, id. Div. 2, 46, 96: nulla meditationis suspicio, id. Brut. 37, 139: mortis, Sen. Ep. 54, 2: campestris, Plin. Pan. 13, 35: dicendi, Quint. 2, 10, 2: rhetoricae, Gell. 20, 5, 2.
    2. B. Of things, exercise, practice in any thing, custom, habit: ramum edomari meditatione curvandi, Plin. 17, 19, 30, § 137.

mĕdĭtātĭuncŭlā, ae, f. [dim. of meditatio], a small or trifling preparation, Claud. Mam. de Stat. Anim. 1, 3.

mĕdĭtātīvus, a, um, adj. [meditor], meditative (post-class.): meditativa verba, which signify a desire to perform an action, also called desiderativa (as lecturio, etc.), Diom. p. 336 P.; Prisc. 825 ib.

mĕdĭtātor, ōris, m. [meditor], one who thinks or plans, a meditator (post-class.): meditator (al. meditatus), Prud. στεφ. 5, 265.

mĕdĭtātōrĭum, ii, n. [meditator].

  1. I. A preparation (eccl. Lat.): meditatorium Evangelii, Hier. Ep. 78.
  2. II. A place of preparation, Hier. in Jovin. 2, 12.

1. mĕdĭtātus, a, um, Part. and P. a., from meditor, q. v.

2. mĕdĭtātus, ūs, m. [meditor], a thinking, meditating upon any thing, a meditation, i. q. meditatio (post-class.), App. M. 3, p. 135, 31.

mĕdĭ-terrānĕus, a, um, adj. [mediusterra], midland, inland, remote from the sea, mediterranean (opp. to maritimus).

  1. I. Adj. (class.): nascitur ibi plumbum album in mediterraneis regionibus, in maritimis ferrum, Caes. B. G. 5, 12, 5: locus (opp. maritimus), Quint. 5, 10, 37: homines maxime mediterranei, Cic. Verr. 2, 5, 27, § 70: Enna mediterranea est maxime, id. ib. 2, 3, 83, § 191: commercium, Plin. 5, 10, 11, § 63: jurisdictiones, id. 5, 28, 29, § 105: copiae, Plin. Ep. 2, 17, 28.
    1. B. Esp., in late Lat.: Mediterraneum mare, the Mediterranean Sea, for Mare magnum, Isid. Orig. 13, 16.
  2. II. Subst.: mĕdĭterrānĕum, i, n., the interior (post-Aug.): in mediterraneo est Segeda, Plin. 3, 1, 3, § 10.
    In plur.: mĕdĭterrānĕa, ōrum, n., the inland parts, interior of a country: Galliae, Liv. 21, 31, 2: in mediterraneis Hispaniae, Plin. 33, 12, 51, § 158.

mĕdĭterrĕus, a, um [mediusterra], inland, remote from the sea, another form of the preceding word: mediterream melius quam mediterraneam Sisenna dici putat, Paul. ex Fest. p. 123, 22 Müll.

mĕdĭtor, ātus, 1, v. dep. a. and n. [Sanscr. madh-a, wisdom; Gr. μάθος, μανθάνω, μήδομαι; cf.: medeor, re-med-ium, etc.]; act., to think or reflect upon, to muse over, consider, meditate upon; neutr., to think, reflect, muse, consider, meditate; to design, purpose, intend, etc.; constr. with acc., with ad, de, with dat., with inf., with a rel.-clause, or absol. (class.).

  1. I. Lit.
          1. (α) With acc.: semulque cursuram meditabor ad ludos Olympios, Plaut. Stich. 2, 1, 34: ea para, meditare, cogita, quae, etc., Cic. Fam. 2, 5, 2: nihil aliud cogitare, meditari, curare nisi, etc., id. Rep. 1, 22, 35: forum, subsellia, rostra curiamque, id. de Or. 1, 8, 32: fugam ad legiones, Suet. Tib. 65: cor tuum meditabitur timorem, i. e. promote by meditation, Vulg. Isa. 33, 18.
          2. (β) With ad; ne ad eam rem meditere, Cic. Fam. 2, 3, 1: ad hujus vitae studium meditati illi sunt qui feruntur labores tui, id. Cat. 1, 10, 26.
          3. (γ) With de: ut de tua ratione meditere, Cic. Fam. 1, 8, 4.
          4. (δ) With dat. (ante-class.): nugis, Plaut. Ps. 4, 7, 107.
            (ε) With inf.: jam designatus alio incessu esse meditabatur, Cic. Agr. 2, 5, 13: multos annos regnare meditatus magno labore, id. Phil. 2, 45, 116: cum animo meditaretur proficisci in Persas, Nep. Ages. 4.
            (ζ) With a rel.-clause: ea nunc meditabor quo modo illi dicam, Plaut. Am. 1, 1, 42: meditabor, quo modo cum illo loquar, Cic. Att. 9, 17, 1: quid contra dicerem, mecum ipse meditabor, id. N. D. 3, 1, 1: meditare, quibus verbis incensam illius cupiditatem comprimas, id. Pis. 25, 59.
            (η) Absol.: multis modis meditatus egomet mecum sum, Plaut. Bacch. 3, 2, 1: egressus ad meditandum in agro, Vulg. Gen. 24, 63.
  2. II. Transf., to meditate, study, exercise one’s self in, practise a thing: nugas est meditatus male, Plaut. Ps. 4, 7, 107: Demosthenes perfecit meditando, ut nemo planius esse locutus putaretur, Cic. de Or. 1, 61, 260; cf.: Demosthenes in litore meditans, Quint. 10, 3, 30: quid Crassus ageret meditandi aut discendi causā, Cic. de Or. 1, 30, 136: aut in foro dicere aut meditari extra forum, id. Brut. 88, 302: musam, Verg. E. 1, 2: arma, Veg. Mil. 1, 20: proelia, Juv. 4, 112.
    Transf., of animals: cervi editos partus exercent cursu, et fugam meditari docent, to practise flight, Plin. 8, 32, 50, § 113.
    Of things: semper cauda scorpionis in ictu est: nulloque momento meditari cessat, to move as in readiness to strike, i. e. to threaten, Plin. 11, 25, 30, § 87: semina meditantur aristas, Prud. Cath. 10, 132; also, to murmur, utter a sad cry: clamabo, meditabor ut columba, Vulg. Isa. 38, 14; 59, 11.
  3. III. In pass. signif. (in verb. fin. post-class. and very rare): adulteria meditantur, Min. Fel. Oct. 25, 1.
    But freq. in part. perf.: mĕdĭtā-tus, a, um.
    1. A. Exercised, practised, instructed (only Plautin.): cumque huc ad adulescentem meditatum probe mittam, Plaut. Trin. 3, 3, 88: probe meditatam utramque duco, id. Mil. 3, 3, 29: murmura, Juv. 6, 539.
    2. B. Thought upon, meditated, weighed, considered, studied: meditati sunt doli docte, Plaut. Ps. 4, 1, 30: ea, quae meditata et praeparata inferuntur, Cic. Off. 1, 8, 27: meditatum et cogitatum scelus, id. Phil. 2, 34, 85: meditatum cogitatumque verbum, id. ib. 10, 2, 6: accuratae et meditatae commentationes, id. de Or. 1, 60, 257: oratio, Plin. 26, 3, 7, § 12: doli, Plaut. Ps. 4, 1, 31: meditata et composita oratio (opp. extemporized), Suet. Aug. 84.
      Subst.: mĕdĭtāta, ōrum, n., a carefully prepared speech: sive meditata sive subita proferret, Plin. Ep. 1, 16, 2.
      Hence, adv.: mĕdĭtātē, thoughtfully, designedly, intentionally (ante-class. and post-Aug.): ne tu illorum mores perquam meditate tenes, knowest thoroughly, Plaut. Bacch. 3, 6, 16: hau male meditate male dicax es, id. Curc. 4, 2, 26: effundere probra, Sen. Const. Sap. 11, 3.

Mĕdĭtrīna, ae, f. [medeor, with fem. suffix -tri-, as in nutrix, genetrix; v. Corss. Ausspr. 2, 522], the goddess of Healing; v. the foll. art.

Mĕdĭtrīnālĭa, ĭum, n. [Meditrina], a festival celebrated on the 11th of October in honor of Meditrina (on which occasion a libation of new wine was made for the first time): Octobri mense Meditrinalia dies dictus a medendo, quod Flaccus flamen Martialis dicebat, hoc die solitum vinum novum et vetus libari et degustari medicamenti causā: quod facere solent etiam nunc multi cum dicant: Novum vetus vinum libo: novo veteri vino morbo medeor, Varr. L. L. 6, § 21 Müll.: Meditrinalia dicta hac de causa. Mos erat Latinis populis, quo die quis primum gustaret mustum, dicere ominis gratiā: vetus novum vinum bibo, veteri novo morbo medeor. A quibus verbis etiam Meditrinae deae nomen conceptum ejusque sacra Meditrinalia dicta sunt, Paul. ex Fest. p. 123, 15 Müll.; v. also Calend. Maff. et Amit. in Inscr. Orell. 2, p. 400.

mĕdĭtullĭum, ii, n. [medius and tollus, old form of tellus, q. v.], the middle (ante- and post-class.): in finitimo, legitimo, aeditimo non plus inesse timum, quam in meditullio, tullium, Serv. ap. Cic. Top. 8, 36: in ipso meditullio scenae, App. M. 10, p. 254, 30: medio luci meditullio, id. ib. 5, p. 159: indifferentianec bona nec mala sed velut in meditullio posita, Sen. ap. Hier. adv. Jovin. 1, p. 191 (Fragm. 45 Haas); Hier. Gal. 5, 19 sqq.; Jul. Val. Rer. Gest. Alex. 1, 32: virtutes in meditullio quodam virtutum sunt sitae, App. Dogm. Plat. 2, p. 15.

mĕdĭum, i, v. medius, II.

mĕdĭus, a, um, adj. [Sanscr. madhya, the same; Gr. μέσος; Angl.-Sax. midd; Germ. Mitte; cf. dimidius, meridies (medi-), etc.], that is in the middle or midst, mid, middle (class.).

  1. I. Adj.
    1. A. Lit.: terra complexa medium mundi locum, Cic. Rep. 6, 18, 18; cf. id. ib. 6, 17, 17: medium mundi locum petere, id. Tusc. 5, 24, 69: versus aeque prima, et media, et extrema pars attenditur, id. de Or. 3, 50, 192: ultimum, proximum, medium tempus, id. Prov. Cons. 18, 43: in foro medio, in the midst of the forum, Plaut. Curc. 4, 1, 14; Cic. Q. Fr. 2, 3, 6; cf.: medio foro, in the open forum, Suet. Claud. 18 al.: in solio medius consedit, sat in the middle, Ov. F. 3, 359; Verg. A. 7, 169: considit scopulo medius, id. G. 4, 436: concilio medius sedebat, Ov. M. 10, 144: ignes, Verg. A. 12, 201: medio tempore, in the meantime, meanwhile, Suet. Caes. 76: vinum novum, vetus, medium, i. e. neither old nor new, Varr. ap. Gell. 13, 31, 14: cum plenus fluctu medius foret alveus, full to the middle, Juv. 12, 30.
      With dat.: Peloponnesii Megaram, mediam Corintho Athenisque urbem, condidere, midway between Corinth and Athens, Vell. 1, 2, 4.
      With abl.: si medius Polluce et Castore ponar, between, Ov. Am. 2, 16, 13.
      With inter: cum inter bellum et pacem medium nihil sit, there is no medium, no middle course between, Cic. Phil. 8, 1, 4: inter quos numeros duo medii inveniuntur (sc. numeri), Mart. Cap. 7, § 737.
      With gen.: locus medius regionum earum, half-way between, Caes. B. G. 4, 19: locus medius juguli summique lacerti, between, Ov. M. 6, 409; 5, 564: et medius juvenum ibat, id. F. 5, 67: medius silentūm, Stat. Th. 4, 683.
      With ex: medius ex tribus, Sall. J. 11, 3: medium arripere aliquem, to seize one by the middle, around the body, Ter. Ad. 3, 2, 18: juvenem medium complectitur, Liv. 23, 9, 9: Alcides medium tenuit, held him fast by the middle, Luc. 4, 652: medium ostendere unguem, to point with the middle finger, Juv. 10, 53.
      1. 2. Transf., half (ante- and postclass.): hieme demunt cibum medium, half their food, Varr. R. R. 3, 7, 9: scrupulum croci, Pall. Jan. 18: aurumItalicis totum, medium provincialibus reddidit, Capitol. Anton. Pius, 4 fin.
    2. B. Trop., of the middle, not very great or small, middling, medial, moderate.
      1. 1. Of age: aetatis mediae vir, of middle age, Phaedr. 2, 2, 3.
      2. 2. Of plans, purposes, etc.: nihil medium, nec spem nec curam, sed immensa omnia volventes animo, Liv. 2, 49, 5: medium quiddam tenere, Plin. Ep. 4, 9, 9.
      3. 3. Of intellect: eloquentiā medius, middling, tolerable, Vell. 2, 29, 2: ingenium, moderate, Tac. H. 1, 49.
      4. 4. Undetermined, undecided: medios esse, i. e. neutral, Cic. Att. 10, 8, 4: medium se gerere, Liv. 2, 27: se dubium mediumque partibus praestitit, Vell. 2, 21, 1; cf.: responsum, indefinite, ambiguous, Liv. 39, 39: vocabula, that can be taken in a good or bad sense, ambiguous, Gell. 12, 9, 1.
      5. 5. Indifferent, not imperative: officium, a duty which is not distinctly enjoined by the moral law, but is sustained by preponderant reasoning: medium officium id esse dicunt (Graeci) quod cur factum sit, ratio probabilis reddi possit, Cic. Off. 1, 3, 8; cf.: ex quo intellegitur, officium medium quiddam esse, quod neque in bonis ponatur neque in contrariis, id. Fin. 3, 17, 58; cf. sqq. and Madv. ad loc.: artes, which in themselves are neither good nor bad, indifferent, Quint. 2, 20, 1.
      6. 6. Intermediate: medium erat in Anco ingenium, et Numae et Romuli memor, of a middle kind, resembling each in some degree, Liv. 1, 32, 4: nihil habet ista res (actoris) medium, sed aut lacrimas meretur aut risum, Quint. 6, 1, 45: ille jam paene medius adfectus est ex amoribus et desideriis amicorum, Quint. 6, 2, 17.
        Hence, as subst.: mĕdĭus, i, m., one who stands or comes between, a mediator: medium sese offert, as a mediator, Verg. A. 7, 536: pacator mediusque Syphax, Sil. 16, 222: pacis eras mediusque belli, arbiter, Hor. C. 2, 19, 28; cf.: nunc mediis subeant irrita verba deis, oaths in which the gods were called upon to be mediators, Ov. R. Am. 678.
      7. 7. Central, with ex or in: ex factione media consul, fully committed to it, Sall. H. 3, 61, 8; so (nearly = intimus), viros fortīs et magnanimos eosdem bonos et simplicīsesse volumus: quae sunt ex media laude justititiae, these qualities are clearly among those which make uprightness praiseworthy, Cic. Off. 1, 19, 63: partitiones oratoriae, quae e media illa nostra Academia effloruerunt, id. Part. Or. 40, 139: ingressio e media philosophia repetita est, id. Or. 3, 11; id. Leg. 2, 21, 53: in medio maerore et dolore, id. Tusc. 4, 29, 63; id. Q. Fr. 2, 15, 1: in media dimicatione, the hottest of the fight, Suet. Aug. 10; cf.: in medio ardore certaminis, Curt. 8, 4, 27: in media solitudine, the most profound, Sen. Brev. Vit. 12, 2: in mediis divitiis, in abundant wealth, id. Vit. Beat. 26, 1: in medio robore virium, Liv. 28, 35, 6: in medio ardore belli, id. 24, 45, 4: in media reipublicae luce, the full blaze of public life, Quint. 1, 2, 18: media inter pocula, Juv. 8, 217.
        Hence,
  2. II. Subst.: mĕdĭum, ii, n., the middle, midst.
    1. A. Lit.
      1. 1. Of space (very rare in Cic.): in medio aedium sedens, Liv. 1, 57, 9: maris, id. 31, 45, 11; for which, without in, medio aedium eburneis sellis sedere, id. 5, 41, 2: medio viae ponere, id. 37, 13, 10: in agmine in primis modo, modo in postremis, saepe in medio adesse, Sall. J. 45, 2; for which, without in, medio sextam legionem constituit, Tac. A. 13, 38: medio montium porrigitur planities, id. ib. 1, 64: medio stans hostia ad aras, Verg. G. 3, 486: medio tutissimus ibis, Ov. M. 2, 137: in medium geminos immani pondere caestus Projecit, Verg. A. 5, 401: in medium sarcinas coniciunt, Liv. 10, 36, 1; 13: equitatus consulem in medium acceptum, armis protegens, in castra reduxit, id. 21, 46, 9.
        Trop.: tamquam arbiter honorarius medium ferire voluisse, to cut through the middle, Cic. Fat. 17, 39: intacta invidiā media sunt, ad summa ferme tendit, Liv. 45, 35.
      2. 2. Of time: diei, Liv. 27, 48: medio temporis, in the meantime, meanwhile, Tac. A. 13, 28; cf.: nec longum in medio tempus, cum, the interval, Verg. A. 9, 395; Ov. M. 4, 167; Plin. Ep. 7, 27, 13.
    2. B. Transf.
      1. 1. The midst of all, the presence of all, the public, the community (class.): in medio omnibus palma est posita, qui artem tractant musicam, lies open to all, Ter. Phorm. prol. 16: tabulae sunt in medio, Cic. Verr. 2, 2, 42, § 104: rem totam in medio ponere, publicly, id. ib. 2, 1, 11, § 29: ponam in medio sententias philosophorum, id. N. D. 1, 6, 13: dicendi ratio in medio posita, lies open to all, id. de Or. 1, 3, 12: rem in medium proferre, to publish, make known, id. Fam. 15, 27, 6: vocare in medium, before the public, before a public tribunal: rem in medium vocare coeperunt, id. Clu. 28, 77: in medio relinquere, to leave it to the public, leave it undecided, id. Cael. 20, 48; Sall. C. 19, 16: pellere e medio, to expel, reject, Enn. ap. Cic. Mur. 14, 30 (Ann. v. 272 Vahl.); Cic. Off. 3, 8, 37: cum jacentia verba sustulimus e medio, adopt words from the people, common words, id. de Or. 3, 45, 177; cf.: munda sed e medio consuetaque verba puellae Scribite, Ov. A. A. 3, 479: tollere de medio, to do away with, abolish: litteras, Cic. Verr. 2, 2, 71, § 176: tollere de medio, to put out of the way, cut off, destroy: hominem, id. Rosc. Am. 7, 20: de medio removere, to put out of sight, id. ib. 8, 23: e medio excedere or abire, to leave the world, to die: e medio excessit, she is dead, Ter. Phorm. 5, 7, 74: ea mortem obiit, e medio abiit, id. ib. 5, 8, 30: tollite lumen e medio, Juv. 9, 106: recedere de medio, to go away, retire, withdraw: cur te mihi offers? recede de medio, Cic. Rosc. Am. 38, 112: in medio esse, to be present, Ter. Ad. 3, 5, 32: in medium venire or procedere, to appear, come forward, show one’s self in public, Cic. Verr. 2, 2, 71, § 175: in medium, before the public, for the public, for the community: communes utilitates in medium afferre, id. Off. 1, 7, 22: consulere in medium, to care for the public good, for the good of all, Verg. A. 11, 335; so opp. separantem suas res a publicis, Liv. 24, 22, 14 sq.; 26, 12, 7: quaerere, to make acquisitions for the use of all, Verg. G. 1, 127: cedere, to fall or devolve to the community, Tac. H. 4, 64: conferre laudem, i. e. so that all may have a share of it, Liv. 6, 6: dare, to communicate for the use of all, Ov. M. 15, 66: in medium conferre, in gaming, to put down, put in the pool, Suet. Aug. 71: in medio, for sub dio, in the open air: scorpios fugari posse, si aliqui ex eis urantur in medio, Pall. 1, 35, 12.
      2. 2. A half (ante-class. and post-Aug.): scillae medium conterunt cum aqua, Varr. R. R. 2, 7: scrobem ad medium completo, Col. Arb. 4, 5.
        Hence,
  3. III. Adv.: mĕdĭē, in the middle, in a middling degree, moderately, tolerably (except once in Tac. only post-class.): qui noluerant medie, kept quiet, remained neutral, Tac. H. 1, 19: nec plane optimi, nec oppido deterrimi sunt, sed quasi medie morati, App. Dogm. Plat. 2, p. 22, 23; Eutr. 7, 13; Lact. 6, 15 fin.: ortus medie humilis, Aur. Vict. Caes. 20.
      1. 2. Indefinitely, Ambros. in Luc. 8, 17, 34.

mĕdĭus fĭdĭus and mĕdĭusfĭdĭ-us, v. Fidius.

medix, v. meddix.

medixtutĭcus, v. meddix.

Mezentĭus (not Mezzent-, Mesdent-, Messent-, Mēdient-, or Mēdent-; cf. Rib. in Rhein. Mus. 1857, vol. 12, p. 418 sq.), i, m., a male proper name [of Oscan origin], a tyrant of Cære or Agylla, Liv. 1, 2; Paul. ex Fest. s. v. oscillum, p. 194 Müll.: contemptor divom Mezentius, Verg. A. 7, 648 sq.; cf. Macr. S. 3, 5; and Serv Verg. A. 1, 267; 7, 760; 9, 745.