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prō-ĭcĭo (projĭcĭo), jēci, jectum, 3, v. a. [jacio].

  1. I. Lit.
    1. A. In gen., to throw forth or before; to fling away, throw down; to throw, thrust, drive, or put out; to stretch out, hold out, extend: projectum odoraris cibum, thrown before or to you, Hor. Epod. 6, 10: frusto cibarii panis ei projecto, App. M. 6, p. 177, 36: cadavera projecta, Varr. L. L. 5, § 25 Müll.: crates, Caes. B. G. 7, 81: aquilam intra vallum, id. ib. 5, 37: aurum in mediā Libyā, Hor. S. 2, 3, 100: aliquid in ignem, Caes. B. G. 7, 25: geminos cestus in medium, Verg. A. 5, 402: tela manu, id. ib. 6, 835: arma, of one in flight (cf.: abicere arma, Just. 8, 2, 4), Caes. B. C. 3, 98; id. B. G. 7, 40; 8, 29; Hirt. B. Alex. 76: omnibus projectis fugae consilium capere, Caes. B. C. 1, 20: insepultos, Liv. 29, 9; Suet. Vesp. 21, 3, 19: Diogenes proici se jussit inhumatum, Cic. Tusc. 1, 43, 104: parvam, to cast out, expose, Plaut. Cist. 2, 3, 74: artus, to stretch out, Val. Fl. 7, 141: hastam, to hold out, extend, Nep. Chabr. 1, 2: strato graves artus, Val. Fl. 7, 141: scutum, to hold in front, to oppose, Sisenn. ap. Macr. S. 6, 4; Liv. 7, 10; cf.: projecto prae se clipeo, id. 32, 25: proicere se ad pedes alicujus, Cic. Sest. 11, 26; Caes. B. G. 1, 31: ad genua alicujus se proicere, Liv. 26, 32, 8: se ex navi, Caes. B. G. 4, 25: se super exanimem amicum, Verg. A. 9, 444: se in forum, Liv. 2, 23; cf.: projecturus semet in flumen, Curt. 9, 4, 12; Gai. Inst. 3, 219.
    2. B. In partic.
      1. 1. To cast out, expel; to exile, banish: tantam pestem evomere et proicere, Cic. Cat. 2, 1, 2: in exilium proici, Sen. Prov. 3, 2: aliquem ab urbe, Ov. M. 15, 504: vix duo projecto (mihi) tulistis opem, id. P. 2, 3, 30: Agrippam in insulam, Tac. A. 1, 3; 4, 71: a facie tuā, Vulg. Psa. 50, 12.
      2. 2. In architecture, to let any part of a building jut out, to cause to project: tectum, Cic. Top. 4, 24: jus immittendi tigna in parietem vicini, proiciendi, protegendi, etc., Dig. 8, 2, 1.
  2. II. Trop.
    1. A. To throw away, i. e. to give up, yield, resign, renounce, reject, disdain, etc. (cf. depono): nec pro his libertatem, sed pro libertate haec proicias, Cic. Phil. 13, 3, 6; id. Rab. Post. 12, 33: patriam virtutem, Caes. B. G. 2, 15: spem salutis, Plin. Ep. 7, 27, 3: ampullas et sesquipedalia verba, Hor. A. P. 97: pudorem, Ov. M. 6, 544: senatūs auctoritatem, Tac. A. 1, 42; cf. Cic. Fam. 14, 2, 8: diem, to deprive one’s self of the light of day, to blind one’s self, Stat. Th. 2, 237.
      Esp. of life: animas, Verg. A. 6, 436: vitam, Luc. 4, 526.
      With personal objects: aliquem, to neglect, desert, forsake, abandon, Caes. B. C. 2, 32, 8: Deum, Vulg. 1 Reg. 10, 19.
    2. B. With se, to rush into any thing: si qui se in hoc judicium forte projecerint, Cic. Cael. 9, 22.
      1. 2. In partic.
        1. a. To rush into danger: epistulae tuae monent et rogant, ne me proiciam, Cic. Att. 9, 6, 5: non integrā re, sed certe minus infractā, quam si una projeceris te, id. ib. 9, 10, 8; cf.: in miserias projectus sum, Sall. J. 14, 21.
        2. b. To degrade one’s self: se in muliebres et inutiles fletus, Liv. 25, 37, 10.
        3. c. To obtrude itself: quae libido non se proripiet ac proiciet occultatione propositā, Cic. Fin. 2, 22, 73.
    3. C. To put off as to time, to defer, delay (post-Aug.): quantum odii fore ab iis qui ultra quinquennium proiciantur, Tac. A. 2, 36.
      Hence, prōjectus, a, um, P. a.
    1. A. Lit., stretched out, extended, jutting out, projecting: urbs projecta in altum, Cic. Verr. 2, 4, 10, § 21: projecta saxa, Verg. A. 3, 699: ova, Liv. 22, 20; and: insula a septentrione in meridiem projecta, Plin. 3, 6, 12, § 80: ventre projecto, projecting, prominent, Suet. Ner. 51; cf. in comp.: ventre paulo projectiore, id. Tit. 3.
      Hence,
      1. 2. Subst.: prō-jectum, i, n., a jutty, projection, projecture in a building, Dig. 50, 16, 242; 43, 17, 6; 43, 24, 22.
    2. B. Trop.
      1. 1. Prominent, manifest: projecta atque eminens audacia, Cic. Clu. 65, 183; id. Rep. 3, 7, 11 (from Non. 373, 25): cupiditas, id. Dom. 44, 115.
      2. 2. Inclined, addicted to any thing, immoderate in any thing: homo ad audendum projectus, Cic. Verr. 2, 1, 1, § 2: homines in verba projecti, Gell. 1, 15, 20: in libidinem, Just. 41, 3, 9.
        Sup.: projectissima ad libidinem gens, Tac. H. 5, 5.
      3. 3. Thrown away; hence, abject, mean, base, contemptible, = abjectus, contemptus: non esse projectum consulare imperium, Liv. 2, 27: projecta patientia, Tac. A. 3, 65 fin.: projectā vilior algā, Verg. E. 7, 42.
        Comp.: quid esse vobis aestimem projectius? Prud. στεφ. 10, 153.
      4. 4. Downcast: vultus projectus et degener, Tac. H. 3, 65.
        Hence, adv.: prō-jectē, carelessly, indifferently (post-class.): Tert. Pud. 13.

prōjectē, adv., v. proicio, P. a. fin.

prōjectīcĭus or -tĭus, a, um, adj. [proicio], cast out, exposed (ante- and postclass.).

  1. I. Lit.: puella, Plaut. Cist. 1, 3, 43; cf. Argum. Cist. 8.
  2. II. Trop.: Palladius projecticius, rejected, despised, Amm. 28, 6, 26.

prōjectĭo, ōnis, f. [proicio], a throwing forward, a stretching out.

  1. I. Lit.: brachii, i e. extension (opp. contractio), Cic. Or. 18, 59: projectiones aquae, jets, Fest. s. v. tullios, p. 352 Müll.
  2. II. Transf., concr., like projectura, a projection, in buildings; also, the right to build a projection, Dig. 43, 17, 3, §§ 5 and 6.

prōjecto, āre, v. freq. a. [proicio].

  1. I. Lit., to drive forth, drive out (post-class.): homines in aperta pericula, Amm. 14, 5, 7.
  2. II. Trop., to reproach, accuse (ante-class.): aliquem probris, Plaut. Bacch. 3, 6, 38: ego projector quod tu peccas, Enn. ap. Rufin. Figur. Sent. p. 222 Ruhnk.

prōjectōrĭus, a, um, adj. [proicio], ejecting, detergent (in later medicine): vis, Theod. Prisc. Diaet. 5: herba projectoriae virtutis, Aem. Mac. 4, 1.

prōjectūra, ae, f. [proicio], a jutty, projecture in buildings, Vitr. 3, 2; 3.

1. prōjectus, a, um, Part. and P. a., from proicio.

2. prōjectus, ūs (only in abl. sing.), m. [proicio], a jutting out, projecting, projection (very rare): corporis, Lucr. 3, 987: frondis, Plin. 17, 11, 19, § 92.